Summary Of Proverbs

The genre of Proverbs is mainly “Proverbs” as the name describes, there are also some Parables and Poetry. This book was written mainly by Solomon, the wisest king ever to rule, however, some of the later sections are written by Lemuel and Agur. It was written during Solomon’s reign 970-930 B.C. He asked God for wisdom to rule God’s nation and He granted the request.

The main purpose of this book is to teach wisdom to God’s people. Proverbs are short clever explanations, which are easy to remember. They contain truisms. These are things which are typically true, however, not always. For example, “He who tills his land will have plenty of bread” (12:11), it is typically true that one who works his land will have bread but it is not a guarantee to always be true. They deal with life, principles, good judgment, and perception. They often draw distinctions between a wise man and a foolish man with parable type examples.

•    In chapters 1-9, Solomon writes about wisdom for younger people. He speaks of details of Godly living and heeding a parent’s advice, “The fear of the LORD is the beginning of knowledge” (1:7). Salvation is through faith and trust in Jesus Christ alone and Proverbs directly teaches us to, “Trust in the LORD with all your heart and do not lean on your own understanding. In all your ways acknowledge Him, And He will make your paths straight” (3:5-6).

•    In chapters 10-24, there is wisdom that applies to average people covering various topics. Many of these parables contrast a righteous man and a wicked man and urge us to commit our way to God, “There is a way which seems right to a man, but its end is the way of death” (14:12).

•    Chapters 25-31, give wisdom to leaders. It was these very proverbs that were transcribed by King Hezekiah’s people, and for good reason (25:1). They contain many warnings and instructions to assist in walking and seeking a Godly life. As would be understood by a leader of an army, Solomon writes in 27:17, “Iron sharpens iron, so one man sharpens another.”

The Sermons Of Jesus

Matthew 5:3-6
Matthew 5:7-9
Matthew 5:10-12
Matthew 5:13
Mattthew 5:14-16
Matthew 5:43-44
Matthew 6:1-4
Matthew 6:9-13
Matthew 6:14-15
Matthew 6:19-21
Matthew 6:25-27
Matthew 6:28-30
Matthew 6:31-34
Matthew 7:13-14
Matthew 7:15-20
Matthew 7:24-27
John 14:1-4
John 14:5-7
John 14:12-14
John 14:15-17
John 14:18-21
John 14:25-27
John 15:1-4
John 15:5-8
John 15:9-11
John 15:14-16
John 15:18-21
John 16:31-33
John 17:1-4

Summary Of Psalms

The genre of Psalms is Songs and Poetry of all kinds. It is written by multiple authors; David wrote 73, Asaph wrote 12, the sons of Korah wrote 9, Solomon wrote 3, Ethan, and Moses each wrote one (Ps. 90), and 51 of the Psalms are anonymous. They were written over the span of approximately 900 years (Beginning at the time of Moses 1440 B.C. and through the captivity in 586 B.C.).

The Psalms include praises of joy, laments, blessings, and thanksgivings. They are directed at God and they help us to express and communicate ourselves to Him. We read about the Psalmist’s emotions from one extreme to another, from praising, delighting in and worshiping God with fervor, to repentance and crying out to Him in despair.

Psalms sits at the very center of the Bible. The major themes found in Psalms are Praise, God’s Power, Forgiveness, Thankfulness and Trust. “My mouth will speak the praise of the LORD, and all flesh will bless His holy name forever and ever” (145:21).

• The book of Psalms was originally divided into five books: Book 1 consisted of chapters 1-41. Book 2 corresponds to chapters 42-72. Book 3 is chapters 73-89. Book 4 included chapters 90-106. Book 5 is compiled with chapters 107-150.

Mainly, the Psalms were written to help us deliver praise to God who is worthy of such. As psalms 150:6 reads, “Let everything that has breath praise the Lord.”

How do we know what God wants for us in our lives? “Your word is a lamp to my feet and a light to my path” (119:105). The answer is found in reading His Word, studying it, and applying its unchanging truths to your life.

Summary Of Job

The book of Job is Narrative History. Its author is unknown yet it is possible that Job himself wrote it. It is possible that Job is the oldest of any book of the Bible written approximately 2100-1800 B.C. Key personalities of this book include Job, Eliphaz the Temanite, Bildad the Shuhite, Zophar the Naamathite, and Elihu the Buzite.

In Job, we see a man who God allows to be directly attacked by Satan. He is an example of faithfulness as he loses everything important to him yet remains faithful to God. Its purpose is to illustrate God’s sovereignty and faithfulness during a time of great suffering.

•    In chapters 1-3, God tests Job’s faithfulness through allowing Satan to attack him. God told Satan, “Behold, all that he has is in your power, only do not put forth your hand on him” (1:12). Through Job’s trials, all is lost including his health, his wife even tells him to curse God and commit suicide, but he remains strong and faithful, “Through all this Job did not sin nor did he blame God.” (1:22).

•    From chapters 4-37, Job’s friends give him plenty of bad advice, in rounds of discussion. They mistakenly blame his sufferings on his personal sins rather than God testing and growing Job. One of them was half-correct in that God wanted to humble him, but this was only a part of God’s test.

•    In chapters 38-42, God speaks to Job and restores him. God knows that Job has received incorrect guidance from his friends, “Who is this that darkens counsel by words without knowledge?” God fittingly declares that humans do not know everything. Then He humbles Job by asking a series of questions that could never be answered by anyone other than Almighty God; for example, “Have you understood the expanse of the earth? Tell Me, if you know all this”. God then brings him to an understanding that believers don’t always know what God is doing in their lives.

In the end, Job answers God by saying, “I have declared that which I did not understand”. God then blessed Job with twice as much as he had before his trials began.

Summary Of Esther

The genre of the book of Esther is Narrative History. Its author is anonymous, however; some believe Mordecai, (Esther’s cousin and guardian), wrote it. It was written approximately 470 B.C. in Persia. Esther became queen in 479 B.C. The key personalities are Esther, Mordecai, King Ahasuerus (or Xerxes), and Haman.

Its purpose is to demonstrate God’s love and sovereignty in all circumstances. It is a post-exile story about Jews who stayed behind after most returned to Jerusalem after captivity. Babylon was conquered by Persia and Esther miraculously becomes the queen of the land and saves her people.

•    In chapter 1-2, Esther becomes the queen to Ahasuerus of Persia. She was personally chosen by the King. “The king loved Esther more than all the women, and she found favor and kindness with him” (2:17), probably because of her beauty and intelligence.

•    Chapters 3-4, Mordecai (Esther’s guardian) refused to bow down and pay homage to Haman a high official of the king. Haman becomes infuriated and plots to destroy all the Jews in the kingdom because of his pride. Mordecai hears of the plot and reports it to his Esther. “For if you remain silent at this time, relief and deliverance will arise for the Jews from another place and you and your father’s house will perish. And who knows whether you have not attained royalty for such a time as this?” (4:14).

•    From chapters 5-10, Esther outwits Haman and takes her petition to the king and pleas for the protection of her Jewish people from Haman’s wicked stratagem. The king out of anger, has Haman hung on the gallows, which he had built to destroy all the Jews. Esther’s faith and courage save her people.

Scripture Writing – Names Of Jesus

I John 2:1-2
John 1.29-31
John 11:21-25
I Peter 2:22-25
I Tim 6:14-16
Is 53:3-5
Rev 3:14-16
I Corinth 10:1-4
Heb 6:19-20
John 10:7-9
John 6:32-35
Songs of Sol 2:1-3
Rev 22:12-14
John 3:1-3
Eph 1:3-6
I Tim 2:3-6
John 10:11-14
John 8:12
John 1:1-5
Eph 2:19-22
Col 1:15-18
Heb 12:1-2
Matt 1:23-25
Is 9:6
John 3:15-17
Luke 1:26-29
Job 19:25-27
Rev 22:16-17
John 14:3-6

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