Worry Doesn’t Solve Anything

“Do not worry about your life, what you will eat or drink; or about your body, what you will wear. Is not life more than food, and the body more than clothes?  (Matthew 6:25)

Worry is essentially a control issue. It’s trying to control the uncontrollable. We can’t control the economy, so we worry about the economy. We can’t control our children, so we worry about our children. We can’t control the future, so we worry about the future.

But worry never solves anything! It’s stewing without doing.

Jesus actually gives four reasons you don’t need to worry in his Sermon on the Mount.

1. Worry is unreasonable.
Matthew 6:25 says, “Do not worry about your life, what you will eat or drink; or about your body, what you will wear. Is not life more than food, and the body more than clothes?”.

Jesus is saying, if it’s not going to last, don’t worry about it. To worry about something you can change is foolish. To worry about something you can’t change is useless. Either way, it’s unreasonable to worry.

2. Worry is unnatural.
Jesus gives us an illustration from nature in Matthew 6:26: “Look at the birds of the air; they do not sow or reap or store away in barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not much more valuable than they?”.

There’s only one thing in all of God’s creation that worries: human beings. We’re the only things God has created that don’t trust him, and God says this is unnatural.

3. Worry is unhelpful.
It doesn’t change anything. Matthew 6:27 says, “Can any one of you by worrying add a single hour to your life?” (NIV). When you worry about a problem, it doesn’t bring you one inch closer to the solution. It’s like sitting in a rocking chair—a lot of activity, energy, and motion, but no progress. Worry doesn’t change anything except you. It makes you miserable!

4. Worry is unnecessary.
Matthew 6:30 says, “If that is how God clothes the grass of the field, which is here today and tomorrow is thrown into the fire, will he not much more clothe you—you of little faith?” (NIV). If you trust in God, you don’t need to worry. Why? Because he has promised to take care of all your needs: “God will meet all your needs according to the riches of his glory in Christ Jesus” (Philippians 4:19).

That includes your bills, relational conflicts, dreams, goals, ambitions, and health issues you don’t know what to do with. God will meet all your needs in Christ.

Don’t worry about it!

How Jesus Died For You: 55 Facts About Jesus Death

Below are facts on How Jesus Died For You. I do not think that we really understand how much Jesus did for us.

Crucifixion was invented by the Persians in 300 BC, and perfected by the Romans in 100 BC.

1. It is the most painful death ever invented by man and is where we get our term “excruciating.”

2. It was reserved primarily for the most vicious of male criminals.

3. Jesus was stripped naked and His clothing divided by the Roman guards. This was in fulfillment of Psalm 22:18, “They divide My garments among them, and for My clothing they cast lots.”

4. The Crucifixion of Jesus guaranteed a horrific, slow, painful death.

5. Jesus’ knees were flexed at about 45 degrees, and He was forced to bear His weight with the muscles of His thigh, which is not an anatomical position which is possible to maintain for more than a few minutes without severe cramp in the muscles of the thigh and calf.

6. Jesus’ weight was borne on His feet, with nails driven through them. As the strength of the muscles of Jesus’ lower limbs tired, the weight of His body had to be transferred to His wrists, His arms, and His shoulders.

7. Within a few minutes of being placed on the Cross, Jesus’ shoulders were dislocated. Minutes later Jesus’ elbows and wrists became dislocated.

8. The result of these upper limb dislocations is that His arms were 9 inches longer than normal, as clearly shown on the Shroud.

9. In addition prophecy was fulfilled in Psalm 22:14, “I am poured out like water, and all My bones are out of joint.”

10. After Jesus’ wrists, elbows, and shoulders were dislocated, the weight of His body on his upper limbs caused traction forces on the Pectoralis Major muscles of His chest wall.

11. These traction forces caused His rib cage to be pulled upwards and outwards, in a most unnatural state. His chest wall was permanently in a position of maximal respiratory inspiration. In order to exhale, Jesus was physiologically required to force His body.

12. In order to breathe out, Jesus had to push down on the nails in His feet to raise His body, and allow His rib cage to move downwards and inwards to expire air from His lungs.

13. His lungs were in a resting position of constant maximum inspiration. Crucifixion is a medical catastrophe.

14. The problem was that Jesus could not easily push down on the nails in His feet because the muscles of His legs, bent at 45 degrees, were extremely fatigued, in severe cramp, and in an anatomically compromised position.

15. Unlike all Hollywood movies about the Crucifixion, the victim was extremely active. The crucified victim was physiologically forced to move up and down the cross, a distance of about 12 inches, in order to breathe.

16. The process of respiration caused excruciating pain, mixed with the absolute terror of asphyxiation.

17. As the six hours of the Crucifixion wore on, Jesus was less and less able to bear His weight on His legs, as His thigh and calf muscles became increasingly exhausted. There was increasing dislocation of His wrists, elbows and shoulders, and further elevation of His chest wall, making His breathing more and more difficult. Within minutes of crucifixion Jesus became severely dyspnoeic (short of breath).

18. His movements up and down the Cross to breathe caused excruciating pain in His wrist, His feet, and His dislocated elbows and shoulders.

19. The movements became less frequent as Jesus became increasingly exhausted, but the terror of imminent death by asphyxiation forced Him to continue in His efforts to breathe.

20. Jesus’ lower limb muscles developed excruciating cramp from the effort of pushing down on His legs, to raise His body, so that He could breathe out, in their anatomically compromised position.

21. The pain from His two shattered median nerves in His wrists exploded with every movement.

22. Jesus was covered in blood and sweat.

23. The blood was a result of the Scourging that nearly killed Him, and the sweat as a result of His violent involuntary attempts to effort to expire air from His lungs. Throughout all this He was completely naked, and the leaders of the Jews, the crowds, and the thieves on both sides of Him were jeering, swearing and laughing at Him. In addition, Jesus’ own mother was watching.

24. Physiologically, Jesus’ body was undergoing a series of catastrophic and terminal events.

25. Because Jesus could not maintain adequate ventilation of His lungs, He was now in a state of hypo-ventilation (inadequate ventilation).

26. His blood oxygen level began to fall, and He developed Hypoxia (low blood oxygen). In addition, because of His restricted respiratory movements, His blood carbon dioxide (CO2) level began to rise, a condition known as Hypercritical.

27. This rising CO2 level stimulated His heart to beat faster in order to increase the delivery of oxygen, and the removal of CO2.

28. The Respiratory Center in Jesus’ brain sent urgent messages to his lungs to breathe faster, and Jesus began to pant.

29. Jesus’ physiological reflexes demanded that He took deeper breaths, and He involuntarily moved up and down the Cross much faster, despite the excruciating pain. The agonizing movements spontaneously started several times a minute, to the delight of the crowd who jeered Him, the Roman soldiers, and the Sanhedrin.

30. However, due to the nailing of Jesus to the Cross and His increasing exhaustion, He was unable to provide more oxygen to His oxygen starved body.

31. The twin forces of Hypoxia (too little oxygen) and Hypercapnia (too much CO2) caused His heart to beat faster and faster, and Jesus developed Tachycardia.

32. Jesus’ heart beat faster and faster, and His pulse rate was probably about 220 beats/minute, the maximum normally sustainable.

33. Jesus had drunk nothing for 15 hours, since 6 pm the previous evening. Jesus had endured a scourging which nearly killed Him.

34. He was bleeding from all over His body following the Scourging, the crown of thorns, the nails in His wrists and feet, and the lacerations following His beatings and falls.

35. Jesus was already very dehydrated, and His blood pressure fell alarmingly.

36. His blood pressure was probably about 80/50.

37. He was in First Degree Shock, with Hypovolaemia (low blood volume), Tachycardia (excessively fast Heart Rate), Tachypnoea (excessively fast Respiratory Rate), and Hyperhidrosis (excessive sweating).

38. By about noon Jesus’ heart probably began to fail.

39. Jesus’ lungs probably began to fill up with Pulmonary Oedema.

40. This only served to exacerbate His breathing, which was already severely compromised.

41. Jesus was in Heart Failure and Respiratory Failure.

42. Jesus said, “I thirst” because His body was crying out for fluids.

43. Jesus was in desperate need of an intravenous infusion of blood and plasma to save His life

44. Jesus could not breathe properly and was slowly suffocating to death.

45. At this stage Jesus probably developed a Hemopericardium.

46. Plasma and blood gathered in the space around His heart, called the Pericardium.

47. This fluid around His heart caused Cardiac Tamponade (fluid around His heart, which prevented Jesus’ heart from beating properly).

48. Because of the increasing physiological demands on Jesus’ heart, and the advanced state of Hemopericardium, Jesus probably eventually sustained Cardiac Rupture. His heart literally burst. This was probably the cause of His death.

49. To slow the process of death the soldiers put a small wooden seat on the Cross, which would allow Jesus the “privilege” of bearing His weight on his sacrum.

50. The effect of this was that it could take up to nine days to die on a Cross.

51. When the Romans wanted to expedite death they would simply break the legs of the victim, causing the victim to suffocate in a matter of minutes. This was called Crurifragium.

52. At three o’clock in the afternoon Jesus said, “Tetelestai,” meaning, “It is finished.” At that moment, He gave up His Spirit, and He died.

53. When the soldiers came to Jesus to break His legs, He was already dead. Not a bone of His body was broken, in fulfillment of prophecy (above).

54. Jesus died after six hours of the most excruciating and terrifying torture ever invented.

55. Jesus died so that ordinary people like you and me could go to Heaven.

Is COVID-19 A Warning To Our World From God?

Before I begin with my thoughts, let me share my core beliefs:
I believe that God is not evil or creates evil.
I believe that God allows events to happen to us.
I believe that He can stop these events when He sees fit.
I believe that God is the same as yesterday, today, and forever. (Hebrews 13:8)
Now that you know my core beliefs, read my thoughts and see if you agree with them.

Like you, I am sure you remember 9/11. But what is more important than 9/11 is 9/12. On that day I believe our nation sincerely sought after God. We were scared. We looked to Him for hope, protection, and guidance.

The following years after 9/11 to February 2020, I have seen a decline in our nation seeking God. In fact I have witnessed our Nation pushing God out of the picture. We have gotten complacent. We are trading God for our modern day idols. For instance, just recently on social media, I had never seen so much hate. Democrat vs republican, states passing laws that it is OK to kill unborn children, I have witnessed sexual perversion at epic proportions. (A nine year old asking how do I tell the world I am gay?) These recent years have made me sad, as I am sure God is looking down and weeping of what we are becoming.

God has taken away everything we worship. God said, “You want to worship athletes, I will shut down the stadiums. You want to worship musicians, I will shut down Civic Centers. You want to worship actors, I will shut down theaters. You want to worship money, I will shut down the economy and collapse the stock market. You don’t want to go to church and worship Me, I will make it where you can’t go to church

So did God cause this to happen? No

Did God allow this to happen to us? My thought is yes, and let me tell you why I think this. If you know your Old Testament Bible and it’s history, look at Israel. Israel was worshipping God. They then started to do what we have done, put God last. God had to bring them back to Him, so He would allow their enemies to overtake them. This happened over and over and over again. They never learned!

Are we in this current cycle like Israel? God allows 9/11, we come back to him, stray away, then COVID-19. Has God allowed COVID-19 to bring us back to Him?

I can’t help to think of this verse:

“If my people who are called by my name will humble themselves and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven and will forgive their sin and will heal their land.” Chronicles 7:14

Maybe we don’t need a vaccine. Maybe we need to take this time of isolation from the distractions of the world to have a personal revival, where we focus on the ONLY thing in the world that really matters. JESUS.

What Is Gods Will

“God . . . invited you into this wonderful friendship with his Son, even Christ our Lord.” 1 Corinthians 1:9

God’s not playing games with you. He wants you to understand his will, purpose, and plan for your life.

You may say, “I want God to guide me, but I still get confused. I don’t know what to do.” Often the problem is we’re looking for the wrong thing.

You need to know what you’re looking for before you can find it.

So, what is God’s will?

1. God’s will is not a feeling.
You may be looking for a feeling or a supernatural sign. You want God to pull your heartstrings so you’ll know exactly what to do.

The problem is that feelings are unreliable; they will often guide you the wrong way. Jeremiah 17:9 says, “The heart is deceitful”. Even your heart plays tricks on you. Even the devil can create a feeling.

Don’t wait for a feeling when you’re trying to figure out God’s plan for your life.

2. God’s will is not a formula.
In our culture, we want everything to be easy. We want things to follow a simple formula so it will instantly change our lives. We want a step-by-step guide.

But there’s a problem with this approach: There’s no room for mistakes.

God’s will is not a closed system. It is dynamic! It is not always an issue of choosing A or B. In fact, many times you can choose from A to Z, and any of them will be okay. It’s your choice. Why would God give you a brain and not expect you to use it? He lets you make choices, and he gives you second chances.

So, if God’s will is not a feeling or a formula, then what is it?

3. God’s will is a relationship.
The Bible says in 1 Corinthians 1:9, “God . . . invited you into this wonderful friendship with his Son, even Christ our Lord”.

There is very little in the Bible about the technique of knowing God’s will. But there are thousands of verses that talk about developing a loving relationship with Jesus Christ. Why? Because God’s will is a relationship.

The better you get to know him, the less confusion you’re going to have about what his will is. When you get to know God, everything else becomes secondary.

When You Need Wisdom and Power, Turn to God

“True wisdom and real power belong to God; from him we learn how to live, and also what to live for.” Job 12:13

The Bible tells the story of Job, a man who loved and served God. But he lost almost everything—his wealth, health, and children—in the span of one day.

Job’s story shows us how to worship even when we’re wounded. Even in the worst times, we can worship God by invoking his wisdom and strength.

Soon after Job had lost it all, he was on the ground in agony, grieving his losses and suffering physically from illness.

Three of Job’s friends showed up and eventually started giving advice. A lot of it wasn’t very helpful, but one friend, Eliphaz, told him, “If I were you, I would call on God and bring my problem before him” (Job 5:8).

Eliphaz is telling Job to invoke God’s help. What does it mean to “invoke”? It means to appeal to someone greater than yourself for a special act, power, or privilege.

That was good advice. When you’re confused, angry, doubting, and wounded, don’t turn away from God. Instead, turn toward him because he’s the only one who has the power to really comfort you.

Once when Jesus was talking to a crowd, he was telling the people what changes they would have to make in their lives in order to follow him. But they didn’t want any demands on their lives, so they started walking away.

John 6:67-68 says Jesus turned to his disciples and asked, “Do you also want to leave?” One of the men, Peter, said, “Lord, where would we go? You have the words of eternal life”.

If you turn away from God in pain, where will you go? No one else can help you like he can. So instead of turning away from him, invoke his strength and wisdom.

The Bible says, “True wisdom and real power belong to God; from him we learn how to live, and also what to live for” (Job 12:13).

Following Jesus doesn’t exempt you from life’s problems. But it does mean God’s wisdom and strength are available to you. Turn to him, and he’ll show you what to do and give you the power to do it.

When Your Eyes Are Full of Tears, Keep Them on God

Before we get to today’s devotional, I want to address the uncertainty associated with the coronavirus. We simply don’t know what the future holds. But one thing you don’t want to be uncertain about is your salvation. Today is the day to step across the line and make a commitment to Christ.

Defeating Fear During the Virus Crisis

Health officials continue to offer common sense steps to contain, reduce, and prevent new infections of the coronavirus. But what should be our spiritual response to this pandemic? How can our hope in Christ remain firm as we walk through this dark valley?

We already know in advance that this virus will not last. It’s a valley that we will walk through, and we’re going to walk through it together.

“The Lord gave me everything I had, and they were his to take away. Blessed be the name of the Lord.” Job 1:21

What would happen if every single thing in your life went bad? Would you still trust God if your plans didn’t work out? If everything fell apart? If you lost it all? Would you be able to honor God even in your pain?
The whole book of Job in the Bible is about answering that one question: Will you worship God when everything in your life goes wrong? For Job, almost everything that could go wrong, did, but he was faithful. He worshiped God by honoring him, even when he was wounded.

So how do you honor God when you don’t understand what’s going on in your life? How do you keep your eyes on God when they’re full of tears?

You honor God, not by thanking him for your problems but by thanking him in the middle of your problems. You do what Job did.

Job 1:21-22 tells us how Job responded: “‘I came naked from my mother’s womb,’ he said, ‘and I shall have nothing when I die. The Lord gave me everything I had, and they were his to take away. Blessed be the name of the Lord.’ In all of this Job did not sin or revile God”.

At each point in your life, you can find reasons to praise God. Life is never all good, and life is never all bad. In every moment you have good and bad together.

Throughout the book of Job, Job finds the good for which he can praise God, even in the middle of the bad. You can use this list to help you praise God, no matter what’s going on. Here’s what you can praise God for:

That he is good and loving (Job 10:12)
That he is all-powerful (Job 36:22, 37:5, 23)
That he notices every detail of your life (Job 23:10, 31:4)
That he is in control (Job 34:13)
That he has a plan for your life (Job 23:14)
That he will protect you (Job 5:11)
Whatever is going on in your life today, choose to honor God in faith.

Change Worry To Worship By Asking God For Help

Don’t worry about anything; instead, pray about everything.”Philippians 4:6

Have you ever had one of those days when nothing goes right? When the odds are stacked against you, you’re overwhelmed, and you wonder if you should just give up and go back to bed?
When you have a day like that—or maybe even a year like that—you have two choices: You can worry, or you can worship.

You can’t do both. If you’re worrying, you’re not going to worship. If you’re worshiping, you’re not going to worry.

Philippians 4:6 says, “Don’t worry about anything; instead, pray about everything. Tell God what you need, and thank him for all he has done”.

The antidote to worry is worship—to pray, praise God, and ask him for what you need.

When many people hear the word “worship,” they think of music. Music is one way to worship. But worship really is an entire lifestyle. Every aspect of your life can be an act of worship to God.

Three enemy nations—the Moabites, Ammonites, and Meunites—ganged up on King Jehoshaphat. The king received a report that they were on their way to fight the nation of Israel.

The odds were three nations against one. But, instead of worrying, Jehoshaphat chose to worship by asking God for help: “Jehoshaphat was afraid, so he decided to ask the LORD what to do” (2 Chronicles 20:3).

His first reaction was fear—and, considering the odds, fear was reasonable.

The king could have let his fear intimidate him, discourage him, or cause him to give up. But, instead, Jehoshaphat let his fear motivate him to worship through prayer.

And he didn’t do it alone. He gathered others to pray with him: “The country of Judah united in seeking GOD’s help—they came from all the cities of Judah to pray to GOD” (2 Chronicles 20:4). 

You likely never have had a day when three nations were united in war against you. But you have had days when the odds were not in your favor. And you will again.

When impossible days come, choose to worship God by asking him to help you. He will always hear and respond.

When You Go To Battle,Trust God To Fight For You

“Do not be afraid or discouraged because of this vast army. For the battle is not yours, but God’s.” 2 Chronicles 20:15

Any lifeguard will tell you: You can’t save anyone as long as they’re trying to save themselves. If you try, that person will just pull you down, too. So you have to tread water until they finally give up, and then it’s easy. You just put a hand over their shoulder, and you swim back to shore.

It’s the same with our relationship with God. When we try to fight through life’s troubles on our own, we sink. Instead, God wants us to stop fighting and trust him to do the work.

God taught Israel’s army that lesson. Three enemy armies were preparing to battle against them. Israel was far outnumbered. But instead of worrying, King Jehoshaphat led his army to worship God by depending on him to save them.

He prayed, “We don’t know what to do—we are begging for your help” (2 Chronicles 20:12).

Then God said to them: “Do not be afraid or discouraged because of this vast army. For the battle is not yours, but God’s” (2 Chronicles 20:15 ).

God wants the same thing from you: He wants you to stop fighting battles and let him fight them for you.

The story in 2 Chronicles continues: “You will not have to fight this battle. Take up your positions; stand firm and see the deliverance the LORD will give you . . . Do not be afraid; do not be discouraged. Go out to face them tomorrow, and the LORD will be with you” (2 Chronicles 20:17).

Aren’t those strange orders? God is telling Israel’s army to go to the battlefield, but not fight.

In whatever you are facing today, that’s what God is asking from you, too. He’s asking you to stand strong, in quiet confidence in him. He’s asking you not to be afraid or discouraged.

If you run from your enemies—from your problems—those things never will get better. God wants you to face your enemies, while trusting him to deliver you from them.

Whatever you’re fighting today, trust God to win the battle for you.

Instead of Worry, Remember What God Has Done

Devotional image from Rick Warren
“With God everything is possible.” (Matthew 19:26 )

When your facing tough times, worry is a natural human response. But, instead of worrying, God wants you to worship. One way you can worship God is by believing who he is and what he can do.

In the book of 2 Chronicles, King Jehoshaphat and Israel found themselves in a tough spot. Three enemy nations were on their way to make war against them.

Though he was afraid, the king’s first response was to gather his people to pray. He stood before the whole nation and prayed aloud. His prayer is a great model to show you how to pray when you feel stressed out and overwhelmed.

First, when you pray during a stressful time, remind yourself of who God is. Focus on his strength, character, and power. God can handle anything, including whatever your facing right now.

In Matthew 19:26, Jesus says, “With God everything is possible”.

King Jehoshaphat knew this is true. He reminded himself of it as he prayed, “Are you not the God who is in heaven? You rule over all the kingdoms of the nations. Power and might are in your hand, and no one can withstand you” (2 Chronicles 20:6).

The king’s enemy was coming against him. But he chose to take his eyes off the problem and instead put his eyes on God’s strength and power. He reminded himself of who God is.

After you remember who God is, remind yourself of what he has done. Remember when God has helped other people and when he has helped you. Recalling those things will give you confidence that God will handle whatever you are facing.

When King Jehoshaphat prays, “Did you not drive out the inhabitants of this land before your people Israel?” (2 Chronicles 20:7), he’s remembering when Moses led the Israelites out of Egypt to the Promised Land.

Jehoshaphat reminded himself of when God had helped Israel drive out enemies before. That gave him confidence that God will do it again.

What are you worrying about today? Instead of worrying, spend some time in prayer, remembering who God is and what he has done. Believe he can handle whatever your facing.

Rely On Gods Power, Not Your Own

“He never grows tired or weary . . . He strengthens those who are weak and tired . . . those who trust in the LORD for help will find their strength renewed.” (Isaiah 40:28-31)

The worst times of life exhaust and drain you. When the roof of your life is falling in, you might look up in despair and say, “What now? What next? I can’t handle one more thing.”

In 2 Corinthians 1:8, Paul tells of having similar thoughts. He says, “We were really crushed and overwhelmed, and feared we would never live through it”.

It sounds like Paul was about ready to give up. But see what happens next: “We felt we were doomed to die and saw how powerless we were to help ourselves; but that was good, for then we put everything into the hands of God, who alone could save us, for he can even raise the dead. And he did help us and saved us from a terrible death; yes, and we expect him to do it again and again” (2 Corinthians 1:9-10).

Paul knew that, since God can raise the dead, he certainly could help him. And that’s true for you, too. That same power that raised Jesus is available to you.

Jesus’ resurrection means no situation is hopeless and no problem is too difficult. If God can raise a dead man, he can resurrect your health or a dead marriage. He can infuse new life into your career.

How can you receive that kind of power? You receive it when God fills your life with the Holy Spirit.

The Bible says, “For the Spirit that God has given us does not make us timid; instead, his Spirit fills us with power, love, and self-control” (2 Timothy 1:7).

When God’s Spirit fills your life, you have true self-control for the first time in your life. You no longer are bashed back and forth by circumstances. With Christ as your Master, you can master your situation. You’re no longer relying on your own power to hold all the strings of your life together. You’re depending on God’s power.

“He never grows tired or weary . . . He strengthens those who are weak and tired . . . those who trust in the LORD for help will find their strength renewed” (Isaiah 40:28-31).

God is faithful. No matter what you’re facing, he will carry you through it.

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